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Archive: Jul 2017

Diamante Animal Sanctuary: Butterfly Life Cycle

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Butterfly Observatory: Spreading their Wings

Surrounded by small fountains and water falls that can entice anyone into falling in love Diamante Eco Adventure Park butterfly observatory is a beautiful place. They say good things take time, but for the butterflies that time is very short.

Blue morpho butterfly

Diamante Life Cycle

Diamante Eco Adventure Park has a variety of different species at the butterfly observatory. They get to Diamante in their second stage of life: chrysalis. The chrysalis stage is also known as the pupa stage. This is the longest life stage for the butterfly and its most fragile. The amount of time spent as a chrysalis varies from species to species but it can range anywhere from 1 to 2 weeks.

Diamante’s Animal Sanctuary – Feeding the Jaguars

Jaguar Animal Sanctuary: Feeding Nico & Sama

Diamante’s Adventure Park beloved jaguars are Nico and Sama. We take great care of them and make sure all their needs are tended to, as all of our animals at the Animal Sanctuary. For our guests, and fellow animal lovers, that inquire about their feedings and how do we feed them, here is a quick break down:

Jaguar Sanctuary Costa Rica: Feeding the Jaguars | Eco Blog (2019)

Sama ready for a bite

*DISCLAIMER* Jaguars are natural predators and are at the top of the food chain here in Costa Rica. Highly trained personnel takes care of everything that involves human interaction: feeding, cage clean up, vet visits, etc. For our safety and theirs no physical contact can be made with the animals.

Diamante Animal Sanctuary: Sloth-A-Feast

Animal Sanctuary Sloths

Feeding Two Toed Sloths … A Slow & Steady Process

Hanging upside down all day every day can be a very exhausting task, especially when you get to eat and sleep all day. *Insert sarcasm here* Lucy, Mia and Gilbert are our most famous and sought out family members here at the Diamante Animal Sanctuary.

You can find them sleeping upside down, in nooks and crannies, in platforms or anywhere they find comfortable within their habitat. But if you really want to see them move, it takes just one small word: Food.